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Originals

 Lancaster AJ-T of No.617 Sqn being towed by tractor to its dispersal slot by a Women's Auxiliary Air Force driver at Scampton, May 1943, in preparation for Operation Chastise.

Tractor Girl by David Pentland. (P)
- £325.00
 Egypt, North Africa, 26th May 1941. Two Panzer IIIG's of Rommel's Afrika Korps advance towards Halfaya Pass during Operation Skorpion. Following the recent loss of the pass to the British in Operation Brevity, the Afrika Korps launched a counter attack to regain the vital position, and forced the British under Lt. Gen. Gott back to Sofafi and Buq Buq.

Operation Skorpion by David Pentland. (P)
Save £500! - £900.00
One of the finest battleships of all time, Bismarck was built by the Blohm and Voss shipyard in Hamburg and launched in February 1939.  Her first duty was for commerce raiding in the north Atlantic.  Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, the destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 and a minesweeper.  The Bismarck, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunther Lutjens, left her last anchorage at Grimstadt Fjord in Norway.  Once Bismarcks departure was confirmed all available British forces were deployed to meet the threat.  On the 24th of May 1941 the Bismarck sailed into naval history - sinking the battlescruiser and pride of the British fleet - HMS Hood.  But Bismarck would have little time to celebrate, she was sunk by a scorned British fleet three days later.  Here Bismarck is depicted on the evening of the 21st May 1941 entering the open sea on her fateful final voyage.

Bismarck - The Final Voyage by Anthony Saunders (P)
Save £1500! - £6500.00
 The image shows Lancaster AJ-P attacking the Mohne dam.  Alongside is the portrait of AJ-P pilot Flt Lt H B Martin.  This aircraft was the third to attack the Mohne dam, and although the bomb was dropped successfully, it veered to the side of the dam and exploded off target.  The aircraft returned safely.<br><br><b>Crew of <i>P for Popsie</i> :</b><br><br>Pilot : Flt Lt H B Martin<br>Flight Engineer : Plt Off I Whittaker<br>Navigator : Flt Lt J F Leggo<br>Wireless Operator : Flg Off L Chambers<br>Bomb Aimer : Flt Lt R C Hay<br>Front Gunner : Plt Off B T Foxlee<br>Rear Gunner : Flt Sgt T D Simpson.

Tribute to the 617 Sqn Dambusters Crew of Lancaster AJ-P by David Pentland. (P)
- £360.00
 On the afternoon of 24th May 1940, Hans-Ekkehard Bob claimed his second victory of the war, shooting down a French Dewoitine 520 fighter in his Me109 of 3./JG21.

Hans-Ekkehard Bob - No.2 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £400.00
 Kiev, Ukraine, 7th August - 26th September 1941. Panzer IIF light tanks of the 11th Panzer Division, 'Ghost', 1st Panzergruppe, Army Group South, advance during the battle of Kiev. This was to be the largest encirclement in history and a crushing defeat for the Soviet Southwestern Front.

Point of the Pincer by David Pentland. (P)
Save £500! - £900.00
 Two Fairey Firefly F Mk1s of 1770 NAS embarked on HMS Indefatigable are shown outbound on Operation Meridian I on 24th January 1945.  The nearest aircraft is DT947, flown by Vin Redding.  Operation Meridian was a series of two air attacks on Japanese-held oil refineries at Palembang on Sumatra.  The huge aviation fuel output of these refineries was reduced to only a quarter of their output after the two raids on the 24th and 29th January 1945.

Fairey Firefly F Mk.Is of 1770 Sqn, 1945 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £1000.00
To increase the strength of the US fleet in the Pacific during the critical early months of the war, USS Indiana went through the Panama Canal.  On the 28th of November 1942 USS Indiana joined Rear Admiral Lee's aircraft carrier screening force.  For the next 11 months, USS Indiana helped protect USS Enterprise and USS Saratoga, which had been supporting the US invasion on the Solomon Islands.  On the 21st of October 1943 USS Indiana went to Pearl Harbor, but after only a couple of weeks left to support forces designated for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands.  The battleship protected the carriers which supported the Marines during the bloody fight for Tarawa atoll.  Then, in late January 1944, she bombarded Kwajalein for eight days prior to the  Marshall Island landings on 1st February 1944.  USS Indiana collided with the battleship USS Washington while refuelling destroyers, killing several men.  Temporary repairs to her starboard side were made at Majuro and USS Indiana returned to Pearl Harbor on 13th February 1944 for additional repair work.  The painting shows USS Indiana with one of the two carriers she protected.

USS Indiana, First Tour of Duty by Anthony Saunders (P)
Save £1000! - £6200.00
 Unterscharfurher Karl-Heinz Turk of the Schwere SS Panzerabteilung 503, in one of the units few remaining Kingtigers, defends the Potsdammer Platz along with elements of the Munchberg Division against the rapidly encroaching Soviet forces.

The Last Battle, Berlin, 30th April 1945 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1900.00
FEATURED WW2 ARTISTS

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Welcome to world-wartwo.co.uk , military website dedicated to the history and artwork of world war two. As you navigate through our superb galleries of military, naval and aviation art by the world's leading artists you will see over 900 military paintings published or distributed by Cranston Fine Arts, the military print company

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LATEST WW2 AVIATION ART RELEASES

 Fl. Lt. Ken Evans DFC is depicted flying Spitfire Mk Vc BR471 over Grand Harbour, Malta, during his posting to 126 Sqn in 1942 where he was credited with 5 enemy aircraft destroyed, 3 damaged and a further 3 probables. He was awarded the DFC in December 1942.

Spitfires Over Malta - Flt Lt Ken Evans DFC by Ivan Berryman.
 Spitfire P9433 DW-E of  No.610 flown by P/O Pegge, in which he shot down two Bf.109Es on 12th August 1940.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Pegge of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
 The Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 Erich Rudorffer is depicted in Fw190A-6 'Black Double Chevron' over the misty forests of Finland in June 1944. Credited with 222 aerial victories, he survived being shot down no less than sixteen times and survived the war until eventually passing away in 2016 aged 98.

Erich Rudorffer by Ivan Berryman.
 F/Lt Warner was shot down in combat with Bf 109s on 16th August 1940 at 17:15hrs off Dungeness.  He was flying Spitfire DW-Z (R6802).

Tribute to Flight Lieutenant Warner of No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)

 Spitfire DW-U (W3455) of 610 Squadron escorting Blenheims to Le Trait on 21st August 1941.  This aircraft was shot down by enemy fighters on this mission.

Escorting Blenheims to Le Trait - Spitfire W3455 of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 With 275 victories credited, Gunther Rall is the third highest scoring Ace in history  He was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Gunther Rall by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Walter Wolfrum, a Knight's Cross winning German WW2 Ace with 137 victories, in his Bf109G.

Walter Wolfrum by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.

LATEST WW2 MILITARY ART RELEASES

 The American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lt. Col. James E. Rudder. During the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches on June 6, 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100-foot cliffs and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha and Utah beaches. At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

Scaling the Cliffs at Pointe du Hoc by Brian Palmer. (P)
 Troops of the 5th Ranger Battalion forge ahead through a hail of plummeting shells and crossfire as their British landing craft from <i>HMS Prince Baudouin</i> make their perilous way to Omaha Beach on D-Day, 6th June 1944.

Through Hell to Omaha by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  On 6th June 1944, D-Day, the Canadian steamship HMCS Prince David  (F89), seen here in the background, released her compliment of landing craft embarking elements of Le Regiment de la Chaudiere, plus some Royal Marines, bound for Mike and Nan beaches.  Their mission was to clear mines and provide cover for the assault craft that were to follow.  By the close of the day, all of her landing craft had been lost to enemy action except one that was accidentally forced onto a semi-submerged obstacle by a friendly tank carrier.

The Drive to Juno by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Lt JG Arend Vyn Jr USCGR guides LCI 91 through a hail of fire toward Omaha Beach on 6th June 1944 carrying 201 men from Headquarters 116th Infantry, 147th Engineers Battalion, 121st Engineers Battalion and 7th Beach Battalion. After a troubled approach to Dog White Beach, a successful disembarkation was accomplished, but US91 was damaged by a mined stake and was eventually lost to enemy artillery as she began her withdrawal, the vessel being abandoned on the sands of Omaha Beach. The command ship  USS Ancon (AGC-4) can be seen in the background.

The Brave 91 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Ardennes, Belgium 10th May 1940. Belgian infantry manning a Hochkiss machine gun await the advancing German army. The Hochkiss M1914 although outdated by 1940 was still a heavy and rock-steady combination of gun and tripod, the world's first efficient air-cooled machine gun, known for its reliability and accuracy.

Defending the Homeland by David Pentland.
 France, 23rd May 1940. The advance guard of Pz38t tanks, 1st Panzer Division enter the little village of Hames-Boucres, on the road to Calais.

The Road to Calais by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 1st June 1940. Beleaguered troops of the BEF, fight a delaying action against the German encirclement of the doomed town.

Rearguard at Dunkirk by David Pentland.
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LATEST WW2 NAVAL ART RELEASES

 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Famed for his night time surface attacks on convoys, Otto Kretschmer, commanding U-99 is shown having claimed another victim beneath a full moon during the Summer of 1940.

U-99 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Type VII U-Boat became the standard design for German submarine warfare during the Second World War, sometimes hunting in packs, but more often alone. This Type VIIC has just claimed another victim, surfacing under the cover of night to observe the fiery demise of another victim.

Lone Wolf by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

This Week's Half Price World War Two Offers

 Dedicated to those who served and died in the Battle of Britain on the ground and in the air during the summer of 1940.

A Nation Alone by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £80.00
Submariners are a special breed of sailor. Their environment, operating deep beneath the surface of the waves, is both unnatural and dangerous, and demands men of cool courage and exceptional quality. Prowling the depths like a mammoth shark, sometimes hunted, submarine crews live and fight, and sometimes die together, alone in the remote expanses of the worlds great oceans. Regardless of national flag under which they sail, this small elite Silent Service is both feared and admired by all who sail the seas.  Plying their deadly trade in World War Two, the German U-boats posed such threat to the vital Atlantic convoys; Winston Churchill feared the submarine threat more than anything Hitler had at his disposal. Hunting in wolf packs, roaming the shipping lanes far beyond the reach of protective aircraft, they decimated the Allied merchant vessels during the Battle of the Atlantic.  Manned entirely by volunteers, British and American submarines saw action in every maritime theatre during the great conflict of 1939 - 1945, the crews fighting their solitary, stealthy, secret war with courage and nerves of steel.  This print captures the menacing beauty of a submarine on the surface: S-Class type HMS Sceptre slips her moorings in Scapa Flow, Scotland, and glides quietly into the North Sea to begin another top secret underwater operation. On the conning tower the skipper takes a final look across the water to the distant highlands while the crew savour the fresh salt air knowing soon they will submerge into their eerie, silent, artificial world, beneath the waves.
Secret Operation by Robert Taylor.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Spitfires of No.41 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.  The lead aircraft is EB-J, flown by Sqn Ldr Maurice Brown.

41 Squadron Spitfires by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 The 79 Sqn Hurricane of P/O E J Morris receiving hits from a Dornier 17 on 31st August 1940. Morris was forced to crash land his aircraft and was slightly wounded following the combat.

Revenge of the Raider by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00

 The Flower Class corvette HMS Sunflower at sea in 1942. One of thirty ordered on 31st August 1939, K41 was built by Smiths Dockyard in just 9 months and 6 days, completed on 25th January 1941.

HMS Sunflower by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
DHM1762GS. Tribute to Johannes Steinhoff by Graeme Lothian.

Tribute to Johannes Steinhoff by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Mosquitos of 105 Squadron, Marham.  No. 105 Squadron, stationed at Marham, Norfolk, became the first Royal Air Force unit to become operational flying the Mosquito B. Mk. IV bomber on 11th April 1942.  The painting shows 105 Squadron on the raid of 10th April 1945, to the Wahren railway marshalling yards at Leipzig, Germany.

Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
In December 1941, Japan entered the Second World War and invaded southern Burma. 17th Indian Infantry Division withdrew to the Sittang River to prevent the Japanese reaching the bridge first, which would have allowed them free access to Rangoon. 2nd Bn The Duke of Wellington's Regiment was rushed from India to join the rearguard.The river, spanned by the railway bridge, was fast-flowing and nearly 1000 yards wide. The bridge was prepared for demolition. Troops mainly from the Indian Army were defending the bridgehead, having suffered severe casualties during a fighting retreat over many days. By 22nd February the Divisional commander decided that he had little choice but to order the demolition of the bridge, knowing that two-thirds of his Division would be stranded on the far bank.As the two central spans of the bridge were blown, the exhausted troops continued fighting to prevent the Japanese securing the bridgehead. This allowed many troops to continue to cross the bridge with the aid of ropes, and rafts made from anything that would float. Others had to swim. The demolition of the bridge was the greatest disaster in the epic fighting retreat of the small, outnumbered British force in Burma, which covered nearly 1,000 miles in three and a half months.

The 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment at the Battle of Sittang Bridge, Burma, February 1942 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Captain Tim Orchard

Senior First Officer Tim Orchard began his flying career in 1971. He has flown over 50 types of aircraft and is currently licenced to fly Aeroplanes, Helicopters, Hot Air Balloons and Hot Air Airships. Tim is an air-test pilot, a Display Pilot, a Flight Instructor and a Senior Examiner (of Pilots and Flight Instructors) for the Civil Aviation Authority. He jointly holds the Concorde World Record time for the journey from New York to London: 2hrs 52 minutes (7th February 1996). Tim has flown in formation with the Concorde on several occasions; the Heathrow 50th Anniversary with Red Arrows and several air-to-air photography sorties. In his career with British Airways Tim has flown the Hawker-Sidley Trident, the Concorde and the Boeing 777 as well as spending nine years as personal pilot to the BA Board in an executive aircraft. Tim is Managing Director of a BA subsidiary which runs its own airfield. He owns a hot air balloon and a 1950s DeHavilland Chipmunk aircraft.

View prints signed by this pilot

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Prints

 The Möhne Dam: 17 May 1943, 00.49 hrs.  The journey had been eventful, flying low they had crossed the Dutch coast and headed inland, skimming along canals and the countryside at tree-top height and meeting heavy flak at various points along the route. Yet now the first two waves of Lancasters had reached the Möhne Dam and, as the enemy flak opened up, the six aircraft began to circle their target.  First Gibson in AJ-G attacked, his bomb exploding successfully, 'Hoppy' Hopgood crashed after being hit by gunfire, and then 'Mick' Martin in Lancaster AJ-P made his bomb run, yet despite being hit twice, the dam still held.  Next Gibson called in 'Dinghy' Young in AJ-A, he too scored a direct hit but it seemed the dam was still un-breached.  Things were looking bad as David Maltby in AJ-J made his run into the target but the top of the wall was starting to crumble. Young's bouncing bomb had in fact cracked the dense granite wall and Maltby finished the job with a direct hit - the Möhne Dam was doomed.  The second in Anthony Saunders' pair of Dambuster 70th Anniversary commemorative paintings, <i>The Breach</i> depicts the scene as Guy Gibson engages enemy flak positions whilst Lancaster AJ-J, with pilot David Maltby at the controls, banks steeply away after delivering the coup-de-grace.  A huge explosion and towering pillar of water marks the breach where a vast torrent begins to flood the valley below.

The Breach by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
Save £60! - £475.00
 Richard Taylor's stunning painting depicts the men of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division as they take inventory of their equipment during the early evening of 5 June 1944.  Adorned with hastily applied invasion stripes, the C-47s of the 438th Troop Carrier Group stand primed, ready to carry the elite unit to Normandy in the early hours of D-Day 1944.  To add to the poignancy of this release, the edition is personally signed by veterans that jumped on D-Day with the 101st Airborne.

Eve of Destiny by Richard Taylor.
Save £60! - £110.00
 As dawn breaks over Normandy on the 6th June 1944, a low flying RAF Douglas Boston of 88 Squadron defies hostile fire to lay a protective smoke screen over the first wave of British troops approaching the invasion beaches. The Boston E for Easy is Piloted by Flight Officer Leslie Valentine C de G. ad his Navigator Pat McVeigh.

Friendly Smoke by Michael Turner.
Save £5! - £83.00
 The Straits of Dover, 12th February 1942. Sub Lieutenant Edgar Lee helps his badly wounded pilot, Sub Lieutenant Brian Rose from the cockpit of their downed Swordfish, before it sinks into the depths of the English Channel following their brave attack on the mighty German fleet. Six Royal Navy Swordfish aircraft manned by 18 aircrew attacked the German warships Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen, with their accompanying flotilla of destroyers and motor torpedo boats and top cover provided by deadly fighter aircraft of the Luftwaffe. But only five Swordfish crew survived.

Channel Dash Heroes by Philip West. (AP)
Save £15! - £120.00
 The Spring of 1943 saw intense bombing raids on the Italian port city of Naples by American B.24s and the Italian pilots responded with spirited attacks on the Liberators, flying from their nearby base of Capodichino.  Just entering service with 22° Gruppo was the new Reggiane Re.2005 fighter, one of which can be seen here rolling away after a head-on attack on the bomber formation.  A 22° Gruppo Macchi 202 has just damaged a B.24 in the distance.

The Defence of Napoli by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
HMS Hotspur  is shown on Convoy protection duties during 1942 / 1943. HMS Hotspur, the H class destroyer, was built by Scotts at Greenock  and launched 23rd March 1936. Participated in the first Battle of Narvik, April 1940 and the Battle of Cape Matapan in March 1941.  In April 1941 took part in the evacuation of Greece and sank the German U-Boat U79 in the Mediterranean north of Sollum on 23rd December 1941.  Sold to the Dominican Republic on 23rd November 1948 and renamed Trujillo.

Hotspur by Anthony Saunders
Save £15! - £25.00
DHM263AP. Mustang by Geoff Lea.

Mustang by Geoff Lea (AP)
Save £10! - £40.00
Ground crew performing routine maintenance on a Sunderland on the slipway at Pembroke.

Fat Alberts Day Off by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Save £30! - £145.00
 The Focke-Wulf 190 development project began in 1937. Conceived as a hedge against total dependence on the Messerchmitt 109, the 190 was designed by Kurt Tank utilizing a radial engine. This was against generally accepted design criteria in Germany, and many historians believe that the decision to produce a radial engine fighter was largely due to the limited manufacturing capacity for in-line, water-cooled engines which were widely used on all other Luftwaffe aircraft. Despite these concerns, Tanks design was brilliant, and the 190 would become one of the top fighter aircraft of WW II. The first prototype flew in mid-1939. The aircraft had excellent flying characteristics, a wonderful rate of acceleration, and was heavily armed. By late 1940 the new fighter was ordered into production. Nicknamed the butcher bird,  by Luftwaffe pilots, early 190s were quite successful in the bomber interceptor role, but at this stage of the War many Allied bombing raids lacked fighter escort. As the War dragged on, Allied bombers were increasingly accompanied by fighters, including the very effective P-51 Mustang. The Allies learned from experience that the 190s performance fell off sharply at altitudes above 20,000 feet. As a result, most Allied bombing missions were shifted to higher altitudes when fighter opposition was likely. Kurt Tank had recognized this shortcoming and began working on a high-altitude version of the 190 utilizing an in-line, water-cooled engine. Utilizing a Jumo 12-cylinder engine rated at 1770-HP, and capable of 2,240-HP for short bursts with its methanol injection system, the 190D, or Long Nose or Dora as it was called, had a top speed of 426-MPH at 22,000 feet. Armament was improved with two fuselage and two wing mounted 20mm cannon. To accommodate the changes in power plants the Dora had a longer, more streamlined fuselage, with 24 inches added to the nose, and an additional 19 inches added aft of the cockpit to compensate for the altered center of gravity. By mid 1944 the Dora began to reach fighter squadrons in quantity. Although the aircraft had all the right attributes to serve admirably in the high altitude interceptor role, it was not generally focused on such missions. Instead many 190Ds were assigned to protect airfields where Me-262 jet fighters were based. This was due to the latter aircrafts extreme vulnerability to Allied attack during takeoff and landing. The 190Ds also played a major role in Operation Bodenplatte, the New Years Day raid in 1945 which destroyed approximately 500 Allied aircraft on the ground. The High Command was impressed with the 190Ds record on this raid, and ordered most future production of the Doras to be equipped as fighter-bombers. In retrospect this was a strategic error, and this capable aircraft was not fully utilized in the role for which it was intended.

Long Nose Trouble by Stan Stokes. (B)
- £115.00
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