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 From June 1940 on, Adolf Galland flew as a of III./JG 26, fighting in the Battle of britain with 109-Emils from bases in the Pas de Calais.  During the Battle of Britain, in a legendary front line General Officer briefing on Luftwaffe tactics, Hermann Goring asked what his pilots needed to win the battle.  Galland replied: <i>I should like an outfit of Spitfires for my squadron.</i>  Göring was speechless with rage.  It is important that this remark is not taken out of context, because Galland also stated (in his autobiography) that <i>of course fundamentally I preferred our Me109 to the Spitfire</i>.  This apparent contradiction was due to his view that because the Spitfire was more manoeuvreable he considered it more suitable to the role of defensive fighter than the Bf 109, though he actually thought that fighters should not be used in a defensive role anyway.  When Galland made the much quoted comment about the Spitfires to Göring he was <i>unbelievably vexed at the lack of understanding and stubbornness with which the command gave us orders we could not execute</i> and so made the comment as a retort to Göring.

Me109 - Adolf Galland by Jason Askew. (P)
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 Juno Beach, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  Sdkfz 232 armoured cars of 12th SS Reconnaissance Battalion commanded by Obersturmfuhrer Peter Hansmann observe the Canadian beachhead at Juno Beach.  His small tram was tasked with finding out if an invasion was actually underway and it drove some 80km, arriving at the coast near Tracy at 7.30 in the morning to witness the landings in progress.

D-Day Recce by David Pentland. (P)
- £425.00
 Jean Bart in company with Richelieu loose off salvoes on the gunnery range in the Med.

Jean Bart by Randall Wilson. (P)
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 Commandos of 1st Special Service Brigade, led by Lord Lovat, are piped past the defenders of the Caen canal (Pegasus) bridge by piper Bill Millin.  The bridge was originally taken in a coup de main attack by the gliders of 6th Airborne Divisions D Company, 2nd battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, led by Major John Howard earlier that morning.  Shortly afterwards the glider troops were reinforced by 7 Parachute Battalion, and together they held the area against German attacks until the main British forces landing at Sword beach could fight through to join them.

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
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 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £2000.00
 Providing vital support to the <i>Pedestal</i> convoy in 1942, No.248 Sqn were in action from their base on the island of Malta when, on 21st August, Sgt Ron Hammond destroyed a probable two aircraft in a single sortie.  Flying Bristol Beaufighter T4843 (WR-X), he first dispatched a Ju88 and then found himself on the tail of a Fiat BR.20.  Approaching on the enemy's right quarter, Hammond shot up the BR.20's starboard engine, the raking fire ripping through the wing and along the fuselage, eventually tearing off the port tailfin, which spun away, perilously close to his own aircraft.  The Fiat was seen to spin out of control, plunging into the sea below.

Mediterranean Fury - Tribute to No.248 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £2200.00
In February 1944, USS Baltimore and Saratoga make up part of the formidable Task Force 58, forcing their way through the central pacific to attack the Japanese bases in the Marshal Islands in support of Operation Flintlock.

USS Baltimore and Saratoga in the Pacific by Anthony Saunders. (P)
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 Short Sunderland Mk.1 L5798 (DA-A) of 210 Sqn, based at Pembroke, dips her wings in salute to HMS Hood as she punches through the North Atlantic swell early in 1941.  By May of that year, this mighty ship would be gone, lost with all but three of her crew, a victim of the might of the German Navy at the savage hands of the Bismarck and Prinz Eugen.

North Atlantic Companions by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 The 617 Sqn Lancaster of Guy Gibson (<i>G for George</i>) thunders over the Mohne Dam on the first attack run of the Dambusters raid, 16th - 17th May 1943.  After several attacks on the dam, it was finally breached by the innovative <i>bouncing bomb</i> designed by Barnes-Wallis.

Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £275.00

Chris Collingwood


Randall Wilson


Nicolas Trudgian

Welcome to , military website dedicated to the history and artwork of world war two. As you navigate through our superb galleries of military, naval and aviation art by the world's leading artists you will see over 900 military paintings published or distributed by Cranston Fine Arts, the military print company

Click here to see our selection of WW2 prints supplied with a FREE additional related print.  An exclusive offer from Cranston Fine Arts!


 Spitfire P9433 DW-E of  No.610 flown by P/O Pegge, in which he shot down two Bf.109Es on 12th August 1940.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Pegge of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman.
 The Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 54 Erich Rudorffer is depicted in Fw190A-6 'Black Double Chevron' over the misty forests of Finland in June 1944. Credited with 222 aerial victories, he survived being shot down no less than sixteen times and survived the war until eventually passing away in 2016 aged 98.

Erich Rudorffer by Ivan Berryman.
 F/Lt Warner was shot down in combat with Bf 109s on 16th August 1940 at 17:15hrs off Dungeness.  He was flying Spitfire DW-Z (R6802).

Tribute to Flight Lieutenant Warner of No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Spitfire DW-U (W3455) of 610 Squadron escorting Blenheims to Le Trait on 21st August 1941.  This aircraft was shot down by enemy fighters on this mission.

Escorting Blenheims to Le Trait - Spitfire W3455 of No.610 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (P)

 With 275 victories credited, Gunther Rall is the third highest scoring Ace in history  He was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.

Gunther Rall by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 Walter Wolfrum, a Knight's Cross winning German WW2 Ace with 137 victories, in his Bf109G.

Walter Wolfrum by Ivan Berryman. (P)
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 The Junkers Ju.287 V1 bomber prototype was a typical example of Germany's research into advanced aerodynamics at the end of World War II. Featuring forward swept wings and four Jumo 004B-1 Orkan axial-flow turbojets, this extraordinary aircraft made several successful flights before the project was curtailed by the war's end. RS+RA is shown on a test flight, carrying a cine camera in front of the fin to record airflow by means of wool tufts glued to the wings and fuselage sides. The characteristics of forward swept wings are only now being re-evaluated, 70 years after Junkers' first tentative steps into the unknown.

A New Shape in the Sky by Ivan Berryman. (P)


 The American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lt. Col. James E. Rudder. During the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches on June 6, 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100-foot cliffs and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha and Utah beaches. At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

Scaling the Cliffs at Pointe du Hoc by Brian Palmer. (P)
 Troops of the 5th Ranger Battalion forge ahead through a hail of plummeting shells and crossfire as their British landing craft from <i>HMS Prince Baudouin</i> make their perilous way to Omaha Beach on D-Day, 6th June 1944.

Through Hell to Omaha by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Lt JG Arend Vyn Jr USCGR guides LCI 91 through a hail of fire toward Omaha Beach on 6th June 1944 carrying 201 men from Headquarters 116th Infantry, 147th Engineers Battalion, 121st Engineers Battalion and 7th Beach Battalion. After a troubled approach to Dog White Beach, a successful disembarkation was accomplished, but US91 was damaged by a mined stake and was eventually lost to enemy artillery as she began her withdrawal, the vessel being abandoned on the sands of Omaha Beach. The command ship  USS Ancon (AGC-4) can be seen in the background.

The Brave 91 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Ardennes, Belgium 10th May 1940. Belgian infantry manning a Hochkiss machine gun await the advancing German army. The Hochkiss M1914 although outdated by 1940 was still a heavy and rock-steady combination of gun and tripod, the world's first efficient air-cooled machine gun, known for its reliability and accuracy.

Defending the Homeland by David Pentland.
 France, 23rd May 1940. The advance guard of Pz38t tanks, 1st Panzer Division enter the little village of Hames-Boucres, on the road to Calais.

The Road to Calais by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 1st June 1940. Beleaguered troops of the BEF, fight a delaying action against the German encirclement of the doomed town.

Rearguard at Dunkirk by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940. Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Wittmann on Patrol by David Pentland.
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 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Famed for his night time surface attacks on convoys, Otto Kretschmer, commanding U-99 is shown having claimed another victim beneath a full moon during the Summer of 1940.

U-99 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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The Yamato was sunk on the 7th of April 1945 by torpedoes and bombs from carrier-borne aircraft while she was on a Kamikaze mission to Okinawa.

Tenichigo by Randall Wilson (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 George Beurlings Spitfire Vc shooting down the Macchi 202 of Italian Faliero Gellis over Malta. The crippled aircraft had been hit in the engine and radiator, but he managed to crash-land it and survived as a prisoner of war. This was the same day that Beurling also shot down Italian ace Furio Niclot and a probable Messerschmitt Bf.109.

Beurlings Day by Ivan Berryman.
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 The allied invasion of Normandy Operation Overlord was the greatest sea-bourne military operation in history. Key to its success and at the heart of the invasion were the Landings of the British 50th division on Gold beach and the Canadian 3rd Division on Juno beach. They provided a vital link between the landings of the British 3rd Division on Sword beach and the Americans on Omaha and Utah beaches. They were also crucial in securing the beachhead and the drive inland to Bayeux and Caen.

Glosters Return by David Griffin (Y)
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 Replacements from 1st Battalion Irish Guards and Sherman tanks of the 46th Royal Tank Regiment move through the debris of Anzio town towards their jump-off positions for the Battle of Campoleone Station.

Anzio, Italy, February 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
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 Launched in January 1915, the Revenge-class battleship HMS Resolution was to enjoy a 33 year career during which she served in the Atlantic, home and Eastern Fleets as well as serving repeated spells in the Mediterranean, being both bombed and torpedoed along the way. She is depicted off Gibraltar with HMS Wolverine, the destroyer perhaps best remembered for destroying the U-47 which sunk Resolutions sister ship Royal Oak in Scapa Flow.

HMS Resolution at Gibraltar by Ivan Berryman (GS)
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 Depicting Dauntless and Devastator attacking the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi during the Battle of Midway.

Midway - The Setting Sun by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 Wing Commander Roland Beamont in his personal Tempest V, intercepted and downed his first V1 Buzzbomb on the night of June 22nd, 1944, over south east England. As Commander of 150 wing and others he went on to shoot down a total of 30 V1 flying bombs, 8 enemy aircraft and 35 locomotives destroyed plus one minesweeper sunk.
A Buzz for Beamont by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Spitfire L1000 (DW-R) of No.610 Sqn is terminally damaged by an Me109 over Dunkirk on 29th May 1940.  The Spitfire pilot, Flying Officer Gerald Kerr is listed is missing after this combat.

Kerrs Last Combat by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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Flight Lieutenant William Robert Bob Hughes DFC AE

Flew with No.23 Sqn during the Battle of Britain.

View prints signed by this pilot

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HMS Warspite is shown in action during the 2nd battle of Narvik, April 1940.

HMS Warspite, Shooting from the Hip by Randall Wilson (AP)
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 Having been posted to help relieve the pressure on the Allied forces in Burma, Frank Carey's 135 Sqn found themselves immediately in action against the Japanese.  On 29th January 1942, Carey's first victim was the Nakajima Ki.27 'Nate' of Sgt-Maj Nagashima of the 77th Sentai, his aircraft falling close to the RAF airfield at Mingaladon Township, Rangoon.  The following month, Carey scored again, claiming three more confirmed Ki.27s, a reconnaissance aircraft, a transport aircraft and another Ki.27.

Ace of Burma - Tribute to Wing Commander Frank Carey by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 On April 18, 1942, Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle led a group of 16 B-25 bombers on a carrier-launched raid on industrial and military targets in Japan. The raid was one of the most daring missions of WW II. Planning for this secret mission began several months earlier, and Jimmy Doolittle, one of the most outstanding pilots and leaders in the United States Army Air Corps was chosen to plan, organize and lead the raid. The plan was to get within 300 or 400 miles of Japan, attack military and industrial targets in Tokyo, Osaka, and Kobe shortly after nightfall, and then fly on to a dawn landing at secret airfields on the coast of China. The twin engine B-25 Mitchell bomber was selected by Doolittle for the mission and practice indicated that it should be possible to launch these aircraft from a carrier deck with less than 500 feet of runway. On April 2, 1942 the USS Hornet and a number of escorts set sail from Alameda, California with the 16 B-25s strapped to its deck. This task force rendezvoused with another including the USS Enterprise, and proceeded for the Japanese mainland. An element of surprise was important for this mission to succeed. When the task force was spotted by a Japanese picket boat, Admiral Halsey made the decision to launch the attack earlier than was planned. This meant that the raiders would have to fly more than 600 miles to Japan, and would arrive over their targets in daylight. It also meant that it would be unlikely that each aircraft would have sufficient fuel to reach useable airfields in China. Doolittle had 50 gallons of additional fuel stowed on each aircraft as well as a dinghy and survival supplies for the likely ditchings at sea which would now take place. At approximately 8:00 AM the Hornets loudspeaker blared, Now hear this: Army pilots, man your planes! Doolittle and his co-pilot R.E. Cole piloted the first B-25 off the Hornets deck at about 8:20 AM. With full flaps, and full throttle the Mitchell roared towards the Hornets bow, just barely missing the ships island superstructure. The B-25 lifted off, Doolittle leveled out, and made a single low altitude pass down the painted center line on the Hornets deck to align his compass. The remaining aircraft lifted off at approximately five minute intervals. The mission was planned to include five three-plane sections directed at various targets. However, Doolittle had made it clear that each aircraft was on its own. He insisted, however, that civilian targets be avoided, and under no circumstances was the Imperial Palace in Tokyo to be bombed. About 30 minutes after taking off Doolittles B-25 was joined by another piloted by Lt. Travis Hoover. These two aircraft approached Tokyo from the north. They encountered a number of Japanese fighter or trainer aircraft, but they remained generally undetected at their low altitude. At 1:30 PM the Japanese homeland came under attack for the first time in the War. From low altitudes the raiders put their cargoes of four 500 pounders into a number of key targets. Despite antiaircraft fire, all the attacking aircraft were unscathed. The mission had been a surprise, but the most hazardous portion of the mission lay ahead. The Chinese were not prepared for the raiders arrival. Many of the aircraft were ditched along the coast, and the crews of other aircraft, including Doolittles were forced to bail out in darkness. There were a number of casualties, and several of the raiders were caught by Japanese troops in China, and some were eventually executed. This painting is dedicated to the memories of those airmen who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country and the thousands of innocent Chinese citizens which were brutally slaughtered as a reprisal for their assistance in rescuing the downed crews.

Destination Tokyo by Stan Stokes.
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 Polish 7TP (Twin Turret) light tank of Captain F. Michalowskis training company breaks out from the street barricade to counter attack German reconnaissance elements.

Warsaw, September 1939 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 Flying his last mission with his old mount, Hawker Tempest EJ762, fresh from repair after being damaged by flak, David Fairbanks found himself embroiled in a fierce battle with Messerschmitt Bf109s on 17th December 1944.  In the course of the combat, Fairbanks shot down two of the enemy aircraft and damaged another before returning safely.

Foob Fairbanks - The Terror of the Rhine by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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Bismarck and Prinz Eugen exiting the Denmark Strait before the historic encounter with HMS Hood.

Big brother little sister (Bismarck and Prinz Eugen ) By Randall Wilson. (GL)
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 Richelieu in the Indian Ocean, 1945.
Richelieu at Sea by Randall Wilson. (P)
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 A dramatic low-level attack on a Japanese base near Rabaul is in progress by F-4U Corsairs of 16 Squadron, RNZAF. Taking the lead is Bryan Cox, as the Corsairs leave a trail of smoke and debris in their wake. Water vapor is squeezed out of the humid atmosphere as Coxs wingman banks sharply to avoid groundfire. The Kiwi Corsairs buccaneered their way through the intensly fought campaigns in the Solomons and Guadalcanal.

Kiwi Strike by Nicolas Trudgian.
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 Lancaster of 50 Squadron being escorted home by Spitfires.  50 Squadron were based at Swinderby

Nursing Her Home by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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David Pentland


Ivan Berryman


Anthony Saunders


Robert Taylor


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