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 With 352 victories to his credit, Erich Hartmann is recognised as the greatest fighter pilot of all time, depicted here as his Messerschmitt Bf.109G prepares for another sortie.

Erich Hartmann by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £310.00
 Bf109Es of JG52 flown by Gunther Rall during the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940.

Bf109Es of JG52 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £400.00
 6th August 1945, Col. Paul Tibbets puts his aircraft, Enola Gay, into a violent turn to evade the blast of the atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. This marked a turning point in the war and history.

Turning Point by David Pentland. (P)
Save £500! - £2600.00
The first light of dawn silhouettes the massive outline of the Yorktown class carrier USS Enterprise, in mid April 1944 she was partnered by the new Essex Class carrier USS Lexington.

Dawn Enterprise by Anthony Saunders (P)
Save £2000! - £6400.00
 Halifax B.II Series 1 (Special) JP254 of 148 Special Duties Squadron, RAF is depicted over the drop zone near to the Alt Aussee salt mine in the Austrian Alps as two of the four SOE agents exit the bomber via the crew access door.  Their mission was to secure and protect 6,755 items of the world's greatest works of art that had been looted and stored by the Germans as they swept across Europe.  With the allied forces closing in, the Germans had planned to blow up the entire store to prevent the artworks from falling into the hands of the liberators. Once on the ground, the four agents linked up with local resistance fighters and the mine and its valuable contents were eventually secured, the explosives made safe and the entire cache taken into the safe keeping of the 80th US Infantry Division as the German occupation of Europe crumbled.

SOE Drop by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £1100.00
B151P. HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Durban Escorts the Troopship RMS Queen Mary by Ivan Berryman. (P)
- £600.00
 Walter Schuck claims one of two P-51 Mustangs shot down as his first two victories in his new Me262 jet fighter.  Flying with JG7, Walter Schuck claimed his first two victories in the jet on 24th March 1945, and eventually went on to claim eight jet victories, and over 200 enemy aircraft in total.

Jet Ace by Brian Bateman. (P)
- £270.00
 Kursk. Russia, 1943. Soviet BM13 multiple rocket launchers barrage German positions.

Katyushas by David Pentland. (P)
- £280.00
 While on an early morning sortie over Dieppe to support the allied landing Operation Jubilee, the Hawker Hurricane IIc of Alex Thom sustained flak damage to its engine.  Despite a severe oil leak he nursed his aircraft safely back to England where he made a successful forced landing.

Danger Over Dieppe by David Pentland. (P)
- £310.00
FEATURED WW2 ARTISTS

Chris Collingwood

 


Randall Wilson

 


Nicolas Trudgian

Welcome to world-wartwo.co.uk , military website dedicated to the history and artwork of world war two. As you navigate through our superb galleries of military, naval and aviation art by the world's leading artists you will see over 900 military paintings published or distributed by Cranston Fine Arts, the military print company

Click here to see our selection of WW2 prints supplied with a FREE additional related print.  An exclusive offer from Cranston Fine Arts!

LATEST WW2 AVIATION ART RELEASES

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The highest scoring fighter pilot of all time with a confirmed tally of 352 victories, Erich Hartmann is depicted getting airborne from a snowy airstrip in Czechoslovakia, late in 1944 in a Bf109G-6 of 6./JG 52.

Erich Hartmann - The Ace of Aces by Ivan Berryman.
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 The Junkers Ju.287 V1 bomber prototype was a typical example of Germany's research into advanced aerodynamics at the end of World War II. Featuring forward swept wings and four Jumo 004B-1 Orkan axial-flow turbojets, this extraordinary aircraft made several successful flights before the project was curtailed by the war's end. RS+RA is shown on a test flight, carrying a cine camera in front of the fin to record airflow by means of wool tufts glued to the wings and fuselage sides. The characteristics of forward swept wings are only now being re-evaluated, 70 years after Junkers' first tentative steps into the unknown.

A New Shape in the Sky by Ivan Berryman. (P)

  Seen here in company with other 485 Sqn machines, Spitfire Mk.IXc ML407 is depicted over the Normandy beaches shortly after D-Day.  Flown by New Zealander Fl Lt Johnnie Houlton, this aircraft claimed a Ju.88 on 6th June and shared in the destruction of another on the same day.  Coded 'V' in honour of his wife, Vickie, ML407 is still flying today, now converted to a two-seater and regularly displayed by Carolyn Grace.

Guardians of the Beaches by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Flying low across the North Sea en route to the Sorpe Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 as part of Operation Chastise, Flying Officer Geoff Rice's Lancaster ED936(G) clipped a large wave, ripping the Upkeep bomb from its mountings and pitching the aircraft into the sea. Somehow, in just a split second, Rice managed to haul AJ-H back into the air, but the aircraft had ingested a huge amount of water and, as Rice put his Lancaster into a climb to head back to Scampton, rear gunner Sgt S Burns and his turret were almost swept away as the water rushed to the back of the aircraft. AJ-H returned to Scampton otherwise unscathed and took no further part in the Dams Raids.

A Lucky Escape by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

LATEST WW2 MILITARY ART RELEASES

 The American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lt. Col. James E. Rudder. During the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches on June 6, 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100-foot cliffs and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha and Utah beaches. At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

Scaling the Cliffs at Pointe du Hoc by Brian Palmer. (P)
 Troops of the 5th Ranger Battalion forge ahead through a hail of plummeting shells and crossfire as their British landing craft from <i>HMS Prince Baudouin</i> make their perilous way to Omaha Beach on D-Day, 6th June 1944.

Through Hell to Omaha by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Lt JG Arend Vyn Jr USCGR guides LCI 91 through a hail of fire toward Omaha Beach on 6th June 1944 carrying 201 men from Headquarters 116th Infantry, 147th Engineers Battalion, 121st Engineers Battalion and 7th Beach Battalion. After a troubled approach to Dog White Beach, a successful disembarkation was accomplished, but US91 was damaged by a mined stake and was eventually lost to enemy artillery as she began her withdrawal, the vessel being abandoned on the sands of Omaha Beach. The command ship  USS Ancon (AGC-4) can be seen in the background.

The Brave 91 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Ardennes, Belgium 10th May 1940. Belgian infantry manning a Hochkiss machine gun await the advancing German army. The Hochkiss M1914 although outdated by 1940 was still a heavy and rock-steady combination of gun and tripod, the world's first efficient air-cooled machine gun, known for its reliability and accuracy.

Defending the Homeland by David Pentland.
 France, 23rd May 1940. The advance guard of Pz38t tanks, 1st Panzer Division enter the little village of Hames-Boucres, on the road to Calais.

The Road to Calais by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 1st June 1940. Beleaguered troops of the BEF, fight a delaying action against the German encirclement of the doomed town.

Rearguard at Dunkirk by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940. Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Wittmann on Patrol by David Pentland.
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LATEST WW2 NAVAL ART RELEASES

 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Famed for his night time surface attacks on convoys, Otto Kretschmer, commanding U-99 is shown having claimed another victim beneath a full moon during the Summer of 1940.

U-99 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Type VII U-Boat became the standard design for German submarine warfare during the Second World War, sometimes hunting in packs, but more often alone. This Type VIIC has just claimed another victim, surfacing under the cover of night to observe the fiery demise of another victim.

Lone Wolf by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

This Week's Half Price World War Two Offers

Flt Lt Alex Thom in his Spitfire MkVc LK-P of 87 Squadron escorting a convoy with his wingman.

Guardian Angels by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Spitfire of 610 Squadron which has been damaged during combat during the height of the Battle of Britain is shown over the white cliffs of Dover.  No. 610 (County of Chester) Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force's first major combat with the Luftwaffe was on 27th May when a Heinkel bomber protected by about 40 Me110s, was engaged.  The combat which followed saw the Heinkel and three Me110 fighters being shot down.  Throughout August 610 Squadron was involved in bitter fighting over the Channel and Home Counties of England.  During the Battle of Britain No.610 Squadron operated from Biggin Hill, Hawkinge, and, on one occasion, from Croydon.  The Squadron put up a terrific show and 40 enemy aircraft were confirmed as having been destroyed by 610 Squadron during August.  The loss to the Squadron was eleven pilots killed during the battle.

Return of the Heroes by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £85.00
 Often described as the most effective fighter escorts in the US Army Air Force, the famous red-tailed Tuskegee airmen could proudly boast that they never lost a single bomber to enemy fighters in all the missions flown. Nearest aircraft here is the P51C of Lt. Lee A Archer Jr, who finished the war with four confirmed victories and one shared. His personal aircraft was named <i>Ina the Macon Belle</i> after his wife.

Red Tails by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Lancasters of 61 Squadron head out for the enemy coast during the night of 3rd November 1943. Seen in the lead Lancaster is Flt Lt Bill Reid flying QR-O. After sustaining two heavy attacks by enemy night fighters, killing two crew members and injuring Reid in the head, shoulders and hands. He carried on to the target, dropping accurately his bomb load. Navigating back by Pole Star and Moon, he lost consciousness on occasions due to blood loss. He managed to find his way Shipdharn. Upon landing the undercarriage collapsed but luckily did not catch fire. For his exploits that night he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

Lancaster VC by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
Half Price! - £240.00

 The submarine depot ship HMS Maidstone is pictured off Hong Kong with a quintet of British submarines alongside for replenishment, namely (left to right) an S-class, a U-class, a T-class and two more U-class.

HMS Maidstone by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
DHM1730GL. US Steel by Randall Wilson.

US Steel by Randall Wilson. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 A handful of Tigers from 2nd Kompanie SS Schwere Panzer Abteilung 101 halted the advance of the British 7th Armoured Division, The Desert Rats, outside the little Norman village of Villers Bocage.  Prowling through the streets of the village, the solitary tank of Hauptsturmfuhrer Michael Wittmann knocked out most of the 4th County of London Yeomanrys regimental HQ Stuart and Cromwell tanks, before falling victim to a 6pdr anti-tank gun.  Wittmann survived the battle but was killed a month later on August 8th 1944.

Counter Attack at Villers Bocage by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £95.00
 The night of the 16th May 1943 saw 19 modified Lancasters of the specially formed 617 squadron set out to breach the Ennepe, Eder, Mohne and Sorpe dams in Westphalia, Germany. The mission was led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson.

The Dambusters by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00

SPECIAL SIGNATURES

Oberstleutnant Helmut Bennemann (deceased)

Helmut Bennemann was born 16th March 1915. During the Battle of Britain Helmut Bennemann was Gruppenadjutant with I./JG52 on the Channel Front. In April 1942 he was Staffelkapitan of 3./JG52 in the east and was appointed Kommandeur of I./JG52 from June 1942 until October 1943. Posted to Italy in November 1943, he was promoted to Kommodore of JG53 (Ace of Spades) in this theatre and in the defence of Germany. He commanded JG53 on Operation Bodenplatte. Helmut Bennemann flew over 400 missions, scoring 92 victories and was awarded the Knight's Cross. He died 17th November 2007.

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Prints

 Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane is shown flying Spitfire Vb BM308 of No.154 Sqn based at Southend in 1942.

Tribute to Wing Commander Brendan 'Paddy' Finucane by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Flying low level at high speed through intense ground fire was all part of the daily task of the pilots of the Typhoon ground attack squadrons. Armed with rockets, 1000lb bombs and four 20mm cannon, this formidable fighter played a leading role in the Allied advance through occupied Europe. Leading up to, and following the Normandy landings through to the end of hostilities, the Typhoon, flown by determined hard hitting pilots, became the scourge of the German Panzer Divisions, and wrought havoc with enemy road and rail communications. Targets along the Rhine, over one of Germanys arteries of supply and communication and last line of defence, were given special attention by the Typhoon squadrons. Barges carrying vital supplies, munition trains on railroads hugging the river bank, and the ever present movement of troops and armour toward the battlefront were constantly attacked from the air. Led by Squadron Leader B. G. Stapme Stapleton, Mk1B Typhoons of 247 Squadron, 2nd Tactical Air Force, based at Eindhoven in Holland, make a low-level attack on enemy river transport on the Rhine in November 1944. Twisting and turning to avoid ground fires as best they can, the Typhoon pilots power their way through the valley with cannons blazing, pressing home their attack by strafing every German military target in their path. The supply cargo aboard the freight train is unlikely to reach its destination today!<br><br><b>Published 1999.</b>

Typhoons Over the Rhine by Nicolas Trudgian. (AP)
Save £20! - £240.00
 Halifax glider tugs of 644 Squadron, Tarrant Rushton, 1944.

Halifax Tugs Towing Hamilcar Gliders by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Save £35! - £105.00
 Richard Taylor's stunning painting depicts the men of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division as they take inventory of their equipment during the early evening of 5 June 1944.  Adorned with hastily applied invasion stripes, the C-47s of the 438th Troop Carrier Group stand primed, ready to carry the elite unit to Normandy in the early hours of D-Day 1944.  To add to the poignancy of this release, the edition is personally signed by veterans that jumped on D-Day with the 101st Airborne.

Eve of Destiny by Richard Taylor. (C)
Save £60! - £1225.00
DHM290GS.  Under Cover of the Night by Simon Smith.

Under Cover of the Night by Simon Smith (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Depicting Spitfires of No.229 squadron as they pass over Malta in 1942, a tribute to the young pilots, regarded as the saviour of an Island.

Maltese Falcons by Anthony Saunders.
- £80.00
 The Battle for Point 112, a strategically positioned hill just a few miles south-west of Caen, was the scene of the most violent fighting between German and British armor, artillery and ground troops during the weeks immediately following the D-Day invasion, in June 1944. Desperate to regain Hill 112, on July 9th, the Tiger tanks of SS Panzer Battalion 102 were ordered to advance. 2 Kompanies Tigers managed to occupy the eastern slopes of the hill, while 1 Kompanie came under fire as they rached the first houses in the small village of Maltot. At this point they came head on to British Sherman tanks. Entering the village firing his 88, Unterscharfuhrer Fey in tank 138 quickly knocked out three Shermans at 200 yards range, and by the evening of July 10th the Panzers had re-taken Maltot. But Allied artillery had driven the Germans off Hill 112. The battle raged on for another three weeks when on August 1st the Allies frove the Germans off Point 112 for the final time. Tigers of SS Panzer Battalion 102 yet again advance towards the infamous hill, passing two Shermans knocked out in the previous days fighting. Overhead, Me109s of II./JG26 give aerial support as the German armour makes a last ditch attempt to repel the advancing forces, in their effort to hold the important city of Caen.

Tigers in Normandy by Nicolas Trudgian. (D)
Save £125! - £270.00
 Borisov, Russia, 2nd July 1941.  The battle for Minsk lasted 12 days, when it ended 300,000 soviet troops had been taken prisoner.  In the air fierce battles were fought to smash an escape route to the citys defenders.  It was during this chaos that Gerd Barkhorn scored his first victory against a Soviet DB-3 bomber. He had flown 120 missions throughout the Battle of Britain, and only succeeded in being shot down himself.  It was only in Russia that his career really took off.  By the end of the war he was credited with 301 victories in 1104 missions.

Above the Cauldron by David Pentland. (AP)
Save £5! - £75.00
 During the climactic phases of WWII, the powerful De Havilland Mosquito, allowed aircrews to fly up to three sorties in twenty-four hours.  The German capital was attacked with such regularity the inhabitants christened the high-speed bmber The Berlin Express.

The Berlin Express by Stuart Brown.
Save £60! - £90.00
FEATURED WW2 ARTISTS

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Robert Taylor

 

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