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 Watched by keen eyes, an Upkeep bomb arrives on the threshold to be loaded onto the special cradle beneath a Lancaster of 617 Dambusters Squadron on the eve of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename Operation Chastise.

Bombing Up by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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BB61 Iowa, was commissioned in February 1943 at the New York Navy yard. her first mission was to the North Atlantic in August 1943 to neutralise the threat of the German Battleship Tirpitz. By early 1944 she joined the Pacific fleet taking part in many of the major battles including Saipan, Leyte Gulf and Okinawa. She was re-commissioned in 1951 for the Korean war and again in April 1984.

USS Iowa leaving New York by Anthony Saunders. (P)
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 Two Fairey Firefly F Mk1s of 1770 NAS embarked on HMS Indefatigable are shown outbound on Operation Meridian I on 24th January 1945.  The nearest aircraft is DT947, flown by Vin Redding.  Operation Meridian was a series of two air attacks on Japanese-held oil refineries at Palembang on Sumatra.  The huge aviation fuel output of these refineries was reduced to only a quarter of their output after the two raids on the 24th and 29th January 1945.

Fairey Firefly F Mk.Is of 1770 Sqn, 1945 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 As the invading forces took hold in Italy, many Italian pilots transferred their allegiance to the Aeronautica Co-Beligerante, among them Maggiore Teresio Martinoli who was to become Italy's highest scoring ace with 22 victories, before being tragically killed in a training accident.  He is depicted here claiming a Ju.52 in the skies of Yugoslavia whilst flying the exceptional Macchi MC.205 Veltro.

Victory near Podgorica by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Albert Kerscher and Otto Carius. Kinderheim, Narva Bridgehead 17th March 1944, 2nd Kompany, 502 Heavy Tank Battalion. Tiger I tanks of Albert Kersher and Otto Carius, of 2nd Company. Heavy tank Battalion 502, pull back to their headquarters at The Kinderheim to reload ammunition and refuel for the next engagement.

Rearm and Resupply by David Pentland. (P)
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 Hans-Joachim Marseilles lines his Bf109 up on Hurricane of No.73 Sqn over North Africa on 17th June 1942.

Star of Africa by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Gneisenau returns to Kiel harbour after participating in Operation Nord Mark. With number one bowline secured crew crew prepares to bring the ship alongside.

K.M.S. Gneisenau - Stand by The Bowlines by Randall Wilson (P)
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 Bir El Gubi , North Africa, 4th December 1941.  Young soldiers of the 'Giovani Fascisti' Division man a 47mm Breda Anti Tank gun during bitter fighting against the 4th Indian Division.  Comprised of volunteers aged from 17 to 21, the GGFF, earned a reputation for bravery, and the nickname <i>Mussolini's Boys</i>.

Mussolini's Boys by David Pentland. (P)
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 Abbey DArdenne, Normandy, 8th July 1944.  Commander of 3rd Company, SS-Panzer Regiment 12, Obersturmfuhrer Rudolf von Ribbentrop, shelters within the walls of the Abbey DArdenne.  After a full day of battle against the Canadians, the remaining Panthers of the unit along with Panzer Grenadiers of 25th Reminet managed to halt their advance just in front of the divisional headquarters at the abbey.

Sanctuary by David Pentland. (P)
- £325.00
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Welcome to world-wartwo.co.uk , military website dedicated to the history and artwork of world war two. As you navigate through our superb galleries of military, naval and aviation art by the world's leading artists you will see over 900 military paintings published or distributed by Cranston Fine Arts, the military print company

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LATEST WW2 AVIATION ART RELEASES

 Austrian-born Walter Nowotny was one of Germany's highest scoring aces of WWII with 258 victories to his credit, three of them flying the Messerschmitt Me.262. He is depicted here flying White 8 of Kommando Nowotny based at Achmer, Germany in 1944. He was killed in action later that year following a fraught combat with US fighters during the Defence of the Reich.

White 8 - Walter Nowotny by Ivan Berryman.
 The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive. The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland. There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle's raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America's resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won. Commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid the painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

Destination Tokyo by Anthony Saunders.
 The Junkers Ju.287 V1 bomber prototype was a typical example of Germany's research into advanced aerodynamics at the end of World War II. Featuring forward swept wings and four Jumo 004B-1 Orkan axial-flow turbojets, this extraordinary aircraft made several successful flights before the project was curtailed by the war's end. RS+RA is shown on a test flight, carrying a cine camera in front of the fin to record airflow by means of wool tufts glued to the wings and fuselage sides. The characteristics of forward swept wings are only now being re-evaluated, 70 years after Junkers' first tentative steps into the unknown.

A New Shape in the Sky by Ivan Berryman. (P)
  Seen here in company with other 485 Sqn machines, Spitfire Mk.IXc ML407 is depicted over the Normandy beaches shortly after D-Day.  Flown by New Zealander Fl Lt Johnnie Houlton, this aircraft claimed a Ju.88 on 6th June and shared in the destruction of another on the same day.  Coded 'V' in honour of his wife, Vickie, ML407 is still flying today, now converted to a two-seater and regularly displayed by Carolyn Grace.

Guardians of the Beaches by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Despite crippling damage to their Lancaster ED925 (G), the crew of AJ-M continued to press home their attack on the Mohne Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943. With both port engines ablaze, Flt Lt J V Hopgood forced his blazing aircraft on, releasing the Upkeep bomb just precious seconds too late to strike the dam, the mine instead bouncing over the wall and onto the power station below with devastating results. ED925 attempted to recover from the maelstrom, but the fuel fire was too intense and the aircraft was tragically lost, just two of her crew managing to escape the impact to spend the rest of the war as PoWs.

No Way Back by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Following the successful attack on the Mohne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943, three Lancasters of 617 Sqn turned their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away, accompanied by Wing Commander Guy Gibson to oversee the next attack. After several aborted attempts to obtain the correct height and direction for their bomb run by Flight Lieutenant Shannon (AJ-L) and  Squadron Leader H E Maudslay (AJ-Z), Gibson called in Maudslay to try again. During his second approach, he released his Upkeep bomb too late. It struck the top of the dam wall and bounced back into the air where it exploded right behind Maudslay's aircraft, lighting up the entire valley and causing considerable damage to the aircraft that had dropped it. Despite what must have been crippling damage, AJ-Z did manage to limp away from the scene and begin the return journey, but Maudslay and all his crew were sadly lost when their aircraft was shot down by flak at Emmerich-Klein-Netterdn. The Eder was finally successfully breached by Pilot Officer Les Knight's aircraft, ED912(G), AJ-N, which returned safely.

Tragedy at the Eder by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Flying low across the North Sea en route to the Sorpe Dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 as part of Operation Chastise, Flying Officer Geoff Rice's Lancaster ED936(G) clipped a large wave, ripping the Upkeep bomb from its mountings and pitching the aircraft into the sea. Somehow, in just a split second, Rice managed to haul AJ-H back into the air, but the aircraft had ingested a huge amount of water and, as Rice put his Lancaster into a climb to head back to Scampton, rear gunner Sgt S Burns and his turret were almost swept away as the water rushed to the back of the aircraft. AJ-H returned to Scampton otherwise unscathed and took no further part in the Dams Raids.

A Lucky Escape by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 En route to the Ruhr Dams on the night of 16/17 May 1943, P/O W C Townsend, demonstrating great skill, flew his aircraft, ED886(G) 'O'- Orange below tree-top height through a forest firetrap on his way to the Ennepe Dam, a feat carried out by moonlight alone.  AJ-O made it successfully to its target where the Upkeep bomb was observed to hit the dam, but with no effect, before returning safely to base the following morning.

Undetected by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

LATEST WW2 MILITARY ART RELEASES

 The American Second Ranger Battalion under the command of Lt. Col. James E. Rudder. During the American assault of Omaha and Utah beaches on June 6, 1944, the Rangers scaled the 100-foot cliffs and seized the German artillery pieces that could have fired on the American landing troops at Omaha and Utah beaches. At a high cost of life, they successfully defended against determined German counterattacks.

Scaling the Cliffs at Pointe du Hoc by Brian Palmer. (P)
  On 6th June 1944, D-Day, the Canadian steamship HMCS Prince David  (F89), seen here in the background, released her compliment of landing craft embarking elements of Le Regiment de la Chaudiere, plus some Royal Marines, bound for Mike and Nan beaches.  Their mission was to clear mines and provide cover for the assault craft that were to follow.  By the close of the day, all of her landing craft had been lost to enemy action except one that was accidentally forced onto a semi-submerged obstacle by a friendly tank carrier.

The Drive to Juno by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 LCT (Landing Craft Tank) 312 is shown unloading a Sherman tank directly onto the beach during the Normandy landings of June 1944. Over 1,000 of these versatile craft were built in the United States, with a small number being constructed in the UK and Canada.

LCT 312 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Lt JG Arend Vyn Jr USCGR guides LCI 91 through a hail of fire toward Omaha Beach on 6th June 1944 carrying 201 men from Headquarters 116th Infantry, 147th Engineers Battalion, 121st Engineers Battalion and 7th Beach Battalion. After a troubled approach to Dog White Beach, a successful disembarkation was accomplished, but US91 was damaged by a mined stake and was eventually lost to enemy artillery as she began her withdrawal, the vessel being abandoned on the sands of Omaha Beach. The command ship  USS Ancon (AGC-4) can be seen in the background.

The Brave 91 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Ardennes, Belgium 10th May 1940. Belgian infantry manning a Hochkiss machine gun await the advancing German army. The Hochkiss M1914 although outdated by 1940 was still a heavy and rock-steady combination of gun and tripod, the world's first efficient air-cooled machine gun, known for its reliability and accuracy.

Defending the Homeland by David Pentland.
 France, 23rd May 1940. The advance guard of Pz38t tanks, 1st Panzer Division enter the little village of Hames-Boucres, on the road to Calais.

The Road to Calais by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 1st June 1940. Beleaguered troops of the BEF, fight a delaying action against the German encirclement of the doomed town.

Rearguard at Dunkirk by David Pentland.
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940. Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Wittmann on Patrol by David Pentland.
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LATEST WW2 NAVAL ART RELEASES

 The experienced crew of a WW2 German  U-boat hunt their next target.

Hunter's Lair by Jason Askew. (P)
 The mainstay of the Royal Navy's Coastal Forces fleet from 1941, the 72-foot Vosper MTBs were among the fastest and most successful ever built. With their three Packard 1400hp engines and bigger fuel tanks, these boats could reach speeds of up to 39 knots with a maximum range of 400 miles. Armament varied from boat to boat, but those depicted are fitted with the standard 21-inch torpedo tubes and a twin .5 inch MkV Vickers machine gun mounting. Crew was typically two officers and eleven ratings.

On the Step by Ivan Berryman.
 In January 1941, the young Mario Arillo was appointed the rank of Lieutenant Commander, placed in charge of the Regia Marina's submarine <i>Ambra</i> and was dispatched to the Mediterranean to help disrupt supplies to the Allied forces.  In May of that same year, Arillo attacked the British Dido Class Cruiser <i>HMS Bonaventure</i>, and Destroyers <i>HMS Hereward</i> and <i>HMS Stuart</i>, south of Crete, en route from Alexandria, the cruiser <i>Bonaventure</i> being sunk with great loss of life.  The <i>Ambra</i> is depicted here in a calmer moment, two of her crew scanning the horizon for 'business'.

Hunter's Dusk by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 Under the command of Gianfranco Gazzana-Priaroggia, the Regia Marina submarine Leonardo da Vinci was to become the most successful non-German submarine of World War Two.  On 21st April 1943, she encountered the liberty ship SS John Drayton which was returning, unladen, to Capetown from Bahrain and put two torpedoes into her before surfacing to finish her off with shells.  The deadly reign of terror wrought by the combination of Gazzana-Priaroggia and his submarine came to an end just one month later when the Leonardo da Vinci was sunk by HMS Active and HMS Ness off Cape Finistere.

Scourge of the Deep - Leonardo da Vinci by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

 Sitting menacingly at a depth of 15 metres below the surface, just 2 km outside the heavily defended harbour of Alexandria, the Italian submarine Scire is shown releasing her three manned torpedoes, or <i>Maiali</i>, at the outset of their daring raid in which the British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant and a tanker, were severely damaged on 3rd December 1941.  All six crew members of the three <i>Maiali</i> survived the mission, but all were captured and taken prisoner.  Luigi Durand de la Penne and Emilio Bianchi can be seen moving away aboard 221, whilst Vincenzo Martellotta and Mario Marino (222) carry out systems checks.  Antonio Marceglia and Spartaco Schergat, on 223, are heading away at the top of the picture.

Assault from the Deep by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 A Type VIIC U-Boat slips quietly toward the open sea from her pen at Lorient, France in 1942.

Dawn Departure by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
  Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (PC)
 The Type VII U-Boat became the standard design for German submarine warfare during the Second World War, sometimes hunting in packs, but more often alone. This Type VIIC has just claimed another victim, surfacing under the cover of night to observe the fiery demise of another victim.

Lone Wolf by Ivan Berryman. (PC)

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Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GS)
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 Spitfire of 761 Training Squadron (attached to the Royal Navy) flies over the Forth Railway Bridge on the eve of World War Two, also shown is HMS Royal Oak departing Rosyth for the open sea.

Land, Sea and Air by Ivan Berryman. (F)
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 Showing visible signs of her tangle with British cruisers at the Battle of the River Plate, the German pocket battleship Graf Spee slips into the neutral waters of the Montevideo roadstead for light repairs.  This was to be the last haven for the Graf Spee which was later scuttled at the harbour mouth, her commander Kapitan zur See Langsdorff believing a large British fleet to be waiting for attempted escape into the South Atlantic.

Admiral Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman.
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 Standing his aircraft at the height of just 60 feet above the waters of the Mohne, Flt Lt Maltby braves a hail of anti-aircraft fire just seconds before the release of the bouncing bomb that would at last breach the dam on that historic night of the 16th/17th May 1943.

Third Time Lucky by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 An outstanding painting commemorating the intrepid 240 American air men who volunteered to fly with the R.A.F. in their early struggle against the Luftwaffe before the U.S.A. joined the war. Taylors painting vibrated with the roar of the Spitfires Merlin engines as they Scramble into action. Goodson later became a 4th Fighter Group Ace.

Eagle Squadron Scramble by Robert Taylor
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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith. (AP)
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 From their position in a knocked out Soviet T28 tank, the Finnish troops keep up the pressure on the encircled enemy units.

Frozen Hell, Suomussalmi, Finland 1940 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 It required more than a little nerve to fly a fighter into the barrage of fire sprayed out by the gunners of a box of B17 bombers; it took even greater courage to do so in the rocket propelled Me163 Komet.  With rocket science still in its infancy, these small aircraft were still in the experimental stage, and piloting what amounted to a flying bomb was in itself a perilous business, let alone flying them into combat.  But these were desperate times.  The day and night bombing assault on Germany was bringing the mighty war machine to its knees, and aything that might help stem the tide was thrown into battle.  Powered by a mixture of two highly volatile chemicals, the slightest leak, or heavy landing could cause a huge explosion, and the mix was so corrosive that in the event of even a minor accident, the pilot could literally be dissolved.  Sitting in a cramped cockpit, surrounded by dangerous chemicals and ammunition, the intrepid aviator would be launched into the sky on what was, at best, a four minute mission.  After, hopefully, engaing the enemy, he would glide powerlessly back to the nearest airfield to be refuelled so as to attempt the hazardous operation all over again.  Though limited to a handful of victories, the Komet did make the Allied crews wonder what else the Luftwaffe had hidden up its sleeve, and had the distinction of being the forerunner of aircraft technology that eventually took aircraft into space.  Capable of nearly 600mph and climbing to 30,000ft in less than two minutes, this tiny rocket propelled Me163 Komet was typical of Germanys ingenuity in its desperate attempts to stem the havoc being wreaked by the USAAFs daylight bombers.

Rocket Attack by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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Captain Les Brodie

Les Brodie joined British Airways as a Trident co-pilot in 1973. He went on to fly 737s out of London Gatwick before joining the Concorde fleet in 1988 as co-pilot. Les became Simulator Instructor for Concorde in 1993 before gaining command on 777s in 1997. Les returned to Concorde as Flight Manager in June 1998 and remained in that position until the retirement of Concorde. Les carried out the last Concorde landing in G-BOAF at Filton on November 26, 2003.

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 The air war fought in the skies above the inhospitable wastelands of the North African desert were among the most hotly contested of the war. The outcome of the bitter land war raging below largely depended upon who controlled the air space above, and both sides knew it. JG-27, having cut its teeth in the battles of France and Britain, was the first Luftwaffe unit to arrive in North Africa. Commanded by the mercurial Eduard Neumann, its Me109s were superior to the Hurricanes and P-40 Kittyhawks flown by the RAF pilots and, without the restriction of close escort duties dictated on the Western Front, the JG-27 pilots roamed the desert skies, closing in combat with the British fighters at every opportunity. The North African air campaign spawned many fighter aces, including Hans-Joachim Marseille who claimed more than 150 victories in his short career - more than any other Luftwaffe ace flying against RAF pilots. The scale of the desert air war is highlighted by raw statistics: 1400 British aircraft lost; over 1200 Luftwaffe destroyed. A dog-fight between Me109s from JG-27 and P-40 Kittyhawks of the RAFs 12 Squadron, led by Killer Caldwell, and later Billy Drake, 112 Squadron were in constant combat with Edu Neumanns fighters as they jousted for air supremacy above Rommels advancing Afrika Korps tanks. Below them, the desolate beauty of the Libyan desert stretches as far as the eye can see. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by two RAF and two Luftwaffe pilots (both of whom did not sign many art prints) who fought in the desert campaign, sadly all of whom have since passed away.  This is a sought after art print and well worth adding to your collection.</b>

Desert Sharks and Eagles by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy.  After the failed Operation Luttich  (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 )  The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat.  It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German  troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (D)
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 The crew of a Junkers 88A-4 of KG.30 about to board their aircraft.

Ju88A-4 and Crew by Ivan Berryman.
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 Boeing B29 Superfortresses of the USAAF 40th Bomb Group come under attack from a Kawasaki Ki64 Hein (Tony) of the Japanese Army Airforces 244th Sentai.

Mission to Yokohama, Japan, June 1944 by David Pentland.
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 A telephone rings at a typical flight dispersal: a call from Operations sends pilots and ground crew running for aircraft ready fuelled and armed. A mechanic starts the engine of the spitfire in the foreground and it explodes into life, blasting out blue exhaust gases, the slipstream flattening the grass and kicking up dust. A young sergeant pilot with feelings a mixture of fear and excitement, runs for his machine. The painting captures the tense atmosphere of a much repeated action from these crucial events of over fifty years ago.

Scramble by Gerald Coulson. (B)
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 HMS Prince of Wales is shown firing on the Bismarck and in the background a huge black cloud is all that is left of HMS Hood.

HMS Prince of Wales by Brian Wood (P)
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One of the most successful of the P-38 equipped units was the 475th Fighter Group, Satans Angels, and it is the P-38s of this famous unit that Nicolas Trudgian has portrayed in his tribute to the American Air Forces that made Victory in the Pacific possible. It is March 1945 and the P-38s of the 475th FG are involved in a huge dogfight with Japanese Zeros over the coast of Indo-China. Flying Pee Wee V is Lt Ken Hart of the 431st Fighter Squadron, who has fatally damaged a Zero in a blistering head on encounter. The second P-38 - Vickie - belongs to Captain John Rabbit Pietz, who would end the War an Ace with six victories.
Pacific Glory by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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 RAF Scampton, 16th May 1943.  Ground crew deliver the top secret bouncing bombs to the Lancasters of 617 Squadron in preparation for Operation Chastise.

The Secret Weapon by David Pentland.
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